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Coat of Arm

HISTORY

 

The Coat of Arm of the Dominican Republic was created at time of the proclamation of their Independence, in 1844. The Coat of Arm of the Dominican Republic has experienced various successive modifications. History registers 21 different Coats of Arms, which includes last version. 

 

The first Coat of Arm of the Dominican Republic has two bay laurel twigs, and below these, forming an arch, there was a serpent biting and swallowing its own tail (as a symbol of eternal evolution).  On a third architectural level, there was, at its center, open, the Bible, opened at the Book of John 8:32 ´and ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set ye free´. At the back of the open Bible, there was a collection of arms (a spear, a rifle with bayonet – positioned at the right, a sable, and a bugler – positioned to the left). At the top of the Bible, positioned is the flag of the Dominican Republic. On a second architectural level, there were two Dominican flags, and, at the crossing of the flagpoles, there was a Phrygian cap (symbol of liberty). On a first architectural level, there was a wide ribbon with the words ´´República Dominicana´´, and at both sides, below, two cannons, with their respective iron balls, arranged as if a pyramid.

 

At time of the Constitution of the Dominican Republic - as Laws and Decrees were passed - the Coat of Arm of the Dominican Republic suffered adjustments on the structure of its shield: cannons were eliminated (Constitution dated November 6, 1844); one of the laurel twigs was substituted for a vine leaf (1848), and again, by a palm leaf  (1853); central flag was replaced by a cross (1853); arms trophy, Phrygian cap, and the serpent disappeared; two crossed flags were substituted by four crossed flags.

 

It was only from 1913 on that the heraldic uniformity was made official by means of Decree (February 6, 1913) signed by the government of Archbishop Dr. Adolfo Alejandro Noüel y Bobadilla, who established the present Coat of Arm and ´´Great Seal of the Dominican Republic´´, and which design is responsibility of writer, historian, geologist, legislator, and politician Casimiro Nemesio De Moya. In addition to the shape and symbols on Coat of Arm, the Decree sat, on its Second Paragraph, colors: Ultramarine Blue and Vermilion Red.

 

PRESENT-DAY COAT OF ARMS

The existence of the Coat of Arms is enshrined in the Constitution of the Dominican Republic, which is described in such as follows: 

 

Article 32 - Dominican Republic´s Coat of Arms. The Coat of Arms of the Dominican Republic has the same colors as its Flag, which are arranged in the same way:  The Bible opened on John 8:32 and is topped by a cross, both symbols arise from a trophy composed of two spears and an arrangement of four flags which bear no coat of arms, two on each side; a bay laurel on the left side, and a palm leaf on the right, crowned by an ultramarine blue ribbon with the inscription: "Dios, Patria y Libertad" (God, Country and Liberty). At the base there is another red vermilion ribbon of which, ends directed upwards, with the inscription: "República Dominicana" (Dominican Republic). The shape of the Coat of Arms of the Dominican Republic is a rectangle, with the upper comers projecting and rounded lower corners; center of its base finishes in a tapered end, and is sat in such a manner, that the results is a perfect square when an horizontal line is traced to join the two verticals of the rectangle from which the lower comers originate. 

 


First Coat of Arms of the Dominican Republic
 
Present-day Coat of Arms of the Dominican Republic

 GENERAL DATA

 

 

Coat of Arms adopted as of: November 6, 1844

Plate: Rectangle British Escutcheon composed of projecting upper corners and rounded lower corners; center finishes in a pointed end

Symbols: A bay laurel twig on its left side, and a palm leaf on its right side.

Motto: "Dios, Patria y Libertad" (God, Country and Liberty)

 

EVOLUTION OF SYMBOLS